North Carolina Great Smoky Mountains National Park map and highlights

USA   Canada   Mexico   S.America   World
Go to content

North Carolina Great Smoky Mountains National Park map and highlights

Map of National Park Great Smoky Mountains in North Carolina and Tennessee
Great Smoky Mountains,  North Carolina and Tennessee. National Park Great Smoky Mountains, North  Carolina and Tennessee on the map of USA.     
Below: Great Smoky Mountains National Park  has more than its share of black bear. Though they may look harmless,  they are wild animals and can be dangerous.     
Great Smoky Mountains, North Carolina and Tennessee     
Established: 1934   Acreage: 520,269
      
The Great Smoky Mountains, the majestic  apex of the Appalachian Highlands, are a wildlands sanctuary preserving  the world's finest examples of temperate deciduous forest. Over 100  species of trees—more than in all of Northern Europe—grow in the Great  Smoky Mountains National Park. The name Smoky comes from the smoke-like  haze enveloping the mountains, which stretch in sweeping troughs and  mighty billows to the horizon.
      
The Smokies have a rich cultural history.  For hundreds of years the Smokies were a part of the huge mountain  empire of the Cherokee Indians under their great chief, Sequoyah. In the  1770s they sided with the British against the colonists. When white  settlers came in from the north and from Virginia and South Carolina,  the Indians began to be crowded out. During the winter of 1838, the  government marched most of them to a new home in Oklahoma. In the years  that followed, the land was worked by hardy and determined Scotch-Irish  settlers who developed a unique way of life in their isolated  surroundings.
      
When the park was established over 1200  tracts of the land purchased were farms owned by these people. As a  result of this purchase, the park has an unequalled collection of log  buildings, including large, two-story dwellings and grist mills,  totalling over 77 historic structures in all. Restored log cabins and  barns punctuate the park's wild qualities, making for a delightful mix  of forest wildlands and an outdoor museum of pioneer life.
      
From the Tennessee side, at Cades Cove,  there is an 11-mile loop drive through a pastoral Smokies scene with  restored buildings and an old mill. The Oconaluftee Visitor Center is  the first stop on the North Carolina side. The nearby Pioneer Farmstead  lets visitors see how the early mountain people lived. Just up the road  into the park is Mingus Mill, a large water-powered mill for grinding  corn. Sugarlands and Oconaluftee are connected by the Newfound Gap Road,  which the Appalachian Trail crosses. The roads are only an introduction  to the Smokies, however. Some 900 miles of trails thread the whole of  the Smokies' natural fabric —its waterfalls, coves and rushing streams.
Back to content